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09 January 2008

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Marie C.

I don't know what this is, but I'm intrigued. A few observations, which I'm sure you've already thought of and probably ruled out. These look more like precision instruments (for lack of a better word), than some of the smithed antique tools we see. That could be key to the time these were used. It's hard to tell, but that discoloration looks like it's been used in fire. But, that doesn't seem right since the metal would have conducted the heat up to the finger holes, thus burning the user. Joe, I'm assuming these are steel and not silver, right? At first glance, the first tool looks almost like a plunger for a medical needle, but only because of the thumb and two finger places.

I'm sure someone will come along that can identify these. I'd love to know.

Mark

They look like a surgical instrument, maybe the kind of thing that'd be inserted into an orifice to grab or break up something. Maybe it's a tool to remove kidney stones or something like that.

maria

I think it is something medical. Is the one with 2 rings on top hollow on the inside? It reminds me of a sort of scope. Or if used for animals, to inject?

Joe

Hey, everybody's name who left a comment begins with an M.

From Melissa's last link it looks like the instrument was a catheter used on male urinary tracts. Ouch.

Melissa

Maybe not... It's definitely a catheter type thing, but I found pictures of similar catheters (even with the 3 finger holes) that had different instruments inserted through them. Some for grasping, some for injecting... The little blades on yours might mean that it's not urinary use but perhaps for some other small long opening (ok that just sounded wrong...) Or maybe it's to break up... I dunno... urinary crystals? (-Everybody in sufficient pain now? ;) )

Joe

From what little I could find out, you and Mark are on the right track - it seems to be an instrument used to break up "things" in the urinary tract.

Jim K.

This instument is used in embalming. The process of embalming uses formalin based fluid injected into the carotid artery. Drainage of the circulatory system is completed by an opening in the jugular vein which lies next to the cartotid artery. Sometimes blood clots can cause the drainage to become compromised. This instrument a "drainage tube", allows the embalmmer to pull out the clots as they get lodged in the tube preventing the jugular vein from getting clogged up when the preservative fluid is introduced on the arterial side.

Jim K.

This instument is used in embalming. The process of embalming uses formalin based fluid injected into the carotid artery. Drainage of the circulatory system is completed by an opening in the jugular vein which lies next to the cartotid artery. Sometimes blood clots can cause the drainage to become compromised. This instrument a "drainage tube", allows the embalmmer to pull out the clots as they get lodged in the tube preventing the jugular vein from getting clogged up when the preservative fluid is introduced on the arterial side.

Jim K.

P.S. Judging from the size of this drainage tube, I'd have to say that this is an infant drainage tube.

Joe

Great information. Thanks, Jim!

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