jschumacher.typepad.com > Hawai'i

I went to a conference in Hawai'i last month. Here is the first batch of photos from that trip. I'll be adding more pictures as I get time. Click on a picture to enlarge.

Concorde Room - JFK

Concorde Room - JFK

The first leg of my trip was an America West flight to Los Angeles. America West shares the same terminal as British Airways and our gate was right next to the Concorde Room. The Concorde recently made its last flight.


LAX

LAX

I was momentarily panicked in Los Angeles when there was no mention of my flight on America West's departure monitor. Then I realized my flight to Honolulu was on Hawaiian Air. As I walked to another terminal I took a quick photo of what I think is a restaurant.


A surprise sight

A surprise sight

The flight arrived in Honolulu in the late afternoon. The shuttle to the hotel seemed to take almost as long as the flight. It took over an hour to get from the airport to Waikiki.

I woke up early Sunday morning and rented a bicycle to explore the town. The bike pedals kept slipping because many of the gear teeth were worn down, bent, or just plain missing. The ride was so unpleasant that I stopped to turn around and get another bike. As I did, I noticed a woman standing in a row of bushes intently looking at something behind the bushes. I took a peek and saw this giraffe and zebra. I was next to the zoo!


Diamond Head Lighthouse

Diamond Head Lighthouse

After switching to an ill-fitting, but functional, bike (I still can't believe the bike guy insisted the first bike was "brand new") I rode back past the zoo and beyond along the road that encircles Diamond Head. The lighthouse is at the high point of the road, which is only about a third of the way up the hill (you can get to the peak from a road on the land side). I turned around here to head back to Honolulu.


Discarded pay phone

Discarded pay phone

For some reason, there was an old pay phone in the bushes along the side of the road.


Garbage can graffiti

Garbage can graffiti

I liked the surfer graffiti on this garbage can. Just down the road from the pay phone.


Diamond Head

Diamond Head

At the bottom of the hill I take this photo of Diamond Head. Note all the dead-appearing trees. This is the dry, leeward side of the mountain. I also check my map to plot out my route. When I look down at the map I notice that my front tire is flat! I've run over about a dozen really sharp thorns. I walk the two miles back to the bike rental place and decide that bicycling isn't in the cards for today. Later in the week I take a walk along the street I would have rode. I find all sorts of interesting restaurants that I would have preferred to the pricey tourist places in Waikiki if I had only known about them earlier. Sigh.


Sleeping visitors

Sleeping visitors

After the ill-fated bicycling attempt I go back to the hotel, shower, and decide to head downtown on the bus. The bus was very slow. Here is a group of five Japanese tourists who were evidently suffering from jet-lag.


Queen Emma St.

Queen Emma St.

Queen Emma was the wife of King Kamehameha IV. Miss Emma is my niece. As far as I know they are not related.


King Kamehameha I

King Kamehameha I

There's a great statue of King Kamehameha I near the State Capitol in Honolulu. Kamehameha I was the king who united the Hawaiian islands. He and his descendents ruled the kingdom for over a century. Unfortunately, the King had his back to the sun and I couldn't get a good head-on photo of him.


Familiar skyline

Familiar skyline

These next few photos were almost all taken between my hotel and the conference hotel in Waikiki. Waikiki itself is rather boring. There's a lot of hotels, tourists, and expensive shops. This New York-themed store window is in a closed-down branch of a Famous Ray's Pizza shop. Famous Ray's is all over Manhattan. Their fame derives from the awfulness of their pizza.


Diamond Head (again)

Diamond Head (again)

Some of the tourist brochures claimed that the Diamond Head crater is the most photographed landmark in the world. Here's it is seen from the Sheraton Waikiki.


Street Performers Hanging Loose

Street Performers Hanging Loose

Kalakaua Ave is the main street through Waikiki. Street performers, psychics, and musicians lined the street. You could get your picture taken holding one or more parrots.


Poster Session

Poster Session

The only "action" photo from the conference. Kristina discussing her research with another conference attendee.


Duke Kahanamoku Statue

Duke Kahanamoku Statue

Statue of Olympic gold medal swimmer and surfing champion Duke Kahanamoku at Kuhio Beach. I read somewhere that the placement of this statue was controversial because Duke has his back to the ocean. A real surfer would never turn his back to the waves.


Santa and his Dolphins

Santa and his Dolphins

It appears that Santa Claus arrives at the Royal Hawaiian Shopping Center carried along by nine dolphins.


Plastic Food

Plastic Food

Many of the restaurants near the hotels employed plastic food to advertise their selections. This is a tasty looking filet mignon, don't you think?


Chandelier

Chandelier

The conference started on Monday. By Wednesday things were getting excrutiatingly boring in the exhibit hall. I started taking photos to amuse myself. Here I'm looking directly up at a giant chandelier. It was large enough, probaby 10-12 feet in diameter, that I couldn't fit it all on the photograph.


Turtle

Turtle

Green Sea Turtles were a recurring motif at the Sheraton Waikiki. There was a floral display in the shape of a turtle, in front of the building, several turtle sculptures in the building, and the carpeting in the ballroom where the conference was held had turtles as well.


Elevator Greetings

Elevator Greetings

I stayed at the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani in Waikiki. The elevators had these little quilts that would be changed throughout the day ("good morning", "good afternoon", "good evening"). The hotel is located on the site of the former royal estate where Ka'iulani grew up.


Princess Ka'iulani Silhouette

Princess Ka'iulani Silhouette

Looking east from my hotel room.


Princess Ka'iulani Statue

Princess Ka'iulani Statue

This statue was erected only in 1999, the 100th anniversary of the princess's death. Ka'iulani would have become the next Hawai'ian queen had not the monarchy been overthrown and annexed by the United States.


Ubiquity

Ubiquity

If you go to Waikiki you are bound to shop at an ABC Store. Waikiki is small, maybe 50 square blocks. Within those blocks there are 37 ABC Stores.


Waikiki Sunset

Waikiki Sunset

There were beautiful sunsets almost every evening. Here's one from Kuhio Beach.


End of the Conference

End of the Conference

For some reason this plastic plant and screen were placed in front of the exit doors in the conference ballroom. Are they there to hide the exit in case of emergency? To beautify the dull room? Hard to tell.

Now, let's do some touring...


The Big Island

The Big Island

A group of conference attendees caught an early Saturday morning flight to the Big Island for a tour of Kilauea. The tour was led by Professor Peter Mouginis-Mark, of the University of Hawai'i, who is describing our itinerary on this model of the island at the Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park visitor's center.


The Caldera

The Caldera

Our first view of the caldera. The crater in the distance is Halemaumau.


Not too profound

Not too profound

Meaningless sign at the USGS Hawai'i Volcano Observatory's Jaggar Museum, next to the rim of the caldera.


Warning

Warning

This sign was located near Halemaumau, because...


Sulfur

Sulfur

... There is still a lot of activity in and near the crater. The volcano emits lots of sulfur, in the form of sulfur dioxide. You could see the sulfur accumulating behind rocks (rocks that were tossed out of the crater in the 1924 eruption, by the way), and you could certainly smell sulfur in the air. The sulfer makes for a concentrated acid rain, which is one reason why there is little plant life near the caldera.


Looking inside the crater

Looking inside the crater

Halema'uma'u is the sacred home of Pele, Hawai'ian Goddess of Fire. The flowers and fruits in the foreground are offerings to the goddess. The last eruption within the crater was in 1982. You can see that the steep walls have begun to collapse into the crater in the background.


Returning what belongs to Pele

Returning what belongs to Pele

Kilauea sits within the Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. It is unlawful to remove objects from national parks. In addition, it is said that removing what is rightfully Pele's angers the goddess and bad luck will befall you. Nonetheless, people do take pieces of lava. Here I am returning lava to the crater that a friend removed.


More Returns

More Returns

Walking back to the tour van I noticed all these rocks in the parking lot. Apparently, a number of visitors were returning rocks, or thought better of removing them.


Along Devastation Trail

Along Devastation Trail

There was a spectacular eruption of Kilauea in November 1959. The lava fountained up to 580m high. Eventually a large cinder cone formed, burying or burning most of the vegetation. We walked along Devastation Trail from the rain forest into the dead zone. Scientists are monitoring the vegetation as it regrows. The trail is promoted as a potential film location.


Ohi'a Tree with Bees

Ohi'a Tree with Bees

The Ohi'a tree is one of the first to recolonize fresh lava.


Weathering

Weathering

The lava is very brittle. Stepping on it made it crack. Here you can see two layers of pahoehoe flow.


Aa and Pahoehoe

Aa and Pahoehoe

There are two types of lava at Kilauea. Aa, on the left, and pahoehoe, on the right. Chemically the lava is the same, but aa lava is thicker and rougher. Pahoehoe lava tends to flow in thin (a couple of inches) sheets, while aa flows may be a several feet thick.


Twisted Pahoehoe Ropes

Twisted Pahoehoe Ropes

As the lava on top of the flow cools and hardens, it is gets pushed by the molten lava below into rope-like rolls. Here's an instance where the rolls were swirled around.


Pahoehoe close-up

Pahoehoe close-up

Cross-section of pahoehoe. The different layers are from succeeding advances of lava, typically within minutes of each other.


Earth Cracks

Earth Cracks

There were lots of warning signs at Kilauea.


No Red Lava Today

No Red Lava Today

About the only disappoint on our field trip was that we didn't get to see active lava flow. There was lava to see, but the round-trip hike would have taken several hours.


Big Earth Crack

Big Earth Crack

This was one of the earth cracks the sign warned us about. It is about ten feet high. More dangerous were the cracks that were ten feet deep.


No Parking

No Parking

Here I am in a no parking zone. This lava flow near the coast occurred last Spring (April 2003) and covered Chain o' Craters Rd.


The End

The End

You couldn't drive any further than this on Chain o' Craters Rd. (Actually, this was a half-mile walk from where you weren't allowed to drive any further).


Where Kilauea meets the sea

Where Kilauea meets the sea

An arch that's not long for this world.


The Rainforest

The Rainforest

After driving down to the coast, we went back up the mountain to the rainforest.


Thurston Lava Tube

Thurston Lava Tube

From the rainforest we walked through a portion of the Thurston lava tube. Lava can travel many miles underground through these lava tubes. There is a lighted trail through a small portion of the Thurston tube.


Leonard's Malasadas

Leonard's Malasadas

Because my flight didn't leave until that night I had one day to explore O'ahu. I started with a trip to Leonard's, a Portuguese bakery just outside of Waikiki. Leonard's specializes in malasadas, which are like jelly donuts without the jelly. I didn't know that when I asked for one. After I asked the woman behind the counter turned around and walked into the back of the bakery. I was pleasantly surprised to find out why - malasadas are served fresh out of the fryer. Incredibly delicious! There's no photo because I inhaled it.


Rabbit Island

Rabbit Island

A nice view off the southeast tip of O'ahu.


Ko'olau Range from near Kane'ohe

Ko'olau Range from near Kane'ohe

The Ko'olau Range is really dramatic looking. As you can tell, I'm now on the rainy side of the island.


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